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Harpers Ferry Guidebook

July 27, 2017 9:37 pm Published by

Harpers Ferry, a sleepy town situated at the gateway of the majestic Appalachian Mountains, was rated as a Top Best Small Town to Visit in 2017 by Smithsonian Magazine. This bucolic destination, which is connected to the Washington, D.C. metro area via commuter rail, is an accessible way to experience the charm of the culturally rich Appalachian region. The new Harpers Ferry Guidebook provides an in-depth look at why your next vacation should be to a bed and breakfast in Harpers Ferry, WV! The Harpers Ferry Guidebook features detailed descriptions of the town’s best eateries, most soothing hiking trails and most immersive educational experiences. The Harpers Ferry Guidebook is available for sale at the Anvil Restaurant and the Country Café.... View Article

Harper’s Ferry: Storer College History

June 13, 2017 10:08 pm Published by

Following the Civil war there were over 30,000 newly freed slaves in the Shenandoah Valley. Recognizing the need for education, the Freedman’s Bureau, the Freewill Baptists of New England and John Storer came together and Storer College was born. The school survived for 88 years, enriching the lives of hundreds of students. The first building to open its doors to students was the Lockwood House, formerly the U.S. Armory Paymaster’s home. In 1865, as a representative of New England’s Freewill Baptist Home Misssion Society, Reverend Nathan Brackett established a primary school in the war-torn building and began teaching reading, writing and arithmetic to students. From Harpers Ferry, Rev. Brackett directed he efforts of dedicated missionary teachers, who provided a basic... View Article

Storer College

June 13, 2017 10:05 pm Published by

Following the Civil War, the Reverend Dr. Nathan Cook Brackett established a Freewill Baptist primary school in the Lockwood House on Camp Hill. Brackett’s tireless efforts to establish freedmen’s schools in the area inspired a generous contribution from philanthopist John Storer of Sanford, Maine, who offered $10,000 for the establishment of a school in the South. The donation was offered on the condition that the school be open to all regardless of sex, race or religion. On October 2, 1867, “Storer Normal School” was opened, and two years later, in December 1869, the federal government formally conveyed the Lockwood House and three other former Armory residences on Camp Hill to the school’s trustees. Frederick Douglass served as a trustee of... View Article